Protecting India’s non VVIP lives and transportation infrastructure

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The city of Mumbai has been the target of most number of terrorist attacks in India. Since 1993, 14 incidents of terrorist attacks in Mumbai have claimed 738 lives and injured 2393 people. Almost 40% of the lives lost (280 deaths) were in train & train station related terrorist attacks, where terrorists either planted bombs in Mumbai’s suburban railway trains (also called as local trains) & near train stations (twice in December 2002, January 2003, March 2003, July 2006) or like 26/11 massacred people at Mumbai’s CST train station using a Fedayeen unit. One would expect that considering these incidents, the security routine at the train stations and areas around it would be the strictest given how easily the terrorists have managed to exploit the loose security routine at and around train stations multiple times. But sadly that isn’t the case at all as I narrate below using my experience of traveling in local trains and intercity trains on my recent visit to Mumbai. After my Mumbai visit, I now strongly believe that those who are in charge of ensuring a secure Mumbai (and India) are a bunch of nincompoops. These hare brained worthies have no idea of how to ensure security for those who use Mumbai’s public transportation infrastructure especially its local train network that is used by 7 million people daily .

One would think that after July 2006 and 26/11; there would be some serious security check routine in Mumbai’s local train network. Traveling in a local train for the first time after I left Mumbai in 2005/6, I was shocked to find that there was absolutely no security check routine at all at the train stations!! Furthermore, my experience of intercity train travel from Mumbai Central to New Delhi left me in no doubt that when it comes to ensuring security for the ordinary train using passenger, our security experts expose their incompetence and their insensitivity to protecting ordinary lives unashamedly. They would not bat an eyelid before spending enormous sums of money for purchasing helicopters for VVIPs but will happily let ordinary people expose themselves to serious risks and terrorist threats in the course of using India’s overcrowded and substandard transportation networks.

Let me corroborate my strong words by narrating in detail the abovementioned intercity travel experience. A couple of days ago, I had a couple of my friends drop me off with my luggage at the entrance of the Mumbai Central station while they went and parked the car. Since I had two unwieldy packages in carton boxes (comprising of two Bose speakers and a Yamaha receiver courtesy a generous gift by another friend) and a trolley bag, I fixed up with a porter by the time my friends returned.  The porter put the luggage onto a trolley and wheeled it in. We walked past a waiting area cum restaurant area in front of the platforms. And then as we walked onto our platform the porter got stopped by a policeman and is asked about the owner of the luggage. When the porter points to me, these are the questions that the police asked me:

What’s in these two cartons?

What is your name?

Can you open your trolley bag? (I did) What’s in the newspaper covered box inside the trolley bag? (I answer bone china tea set and the policeman asks me to close the bag while asking me the following questions)

Where are you from?

Where are you going?

After this the policeman let us carry on. Now, these random questions the policeman asked of me along with the cursory check into my trolley bag hardly makes for a strict security check. There is no orderly system of baggage screening to check for explosives or suspicious looking packages before one gets into the station like is done at airports and at Delhi’s metro stations. Apparently in Mumbai, those responsible for passenger security place their faith in the a) policeman’s skills of somehow picking out a terrorist in a huge crowd and b) his interrogation skills which will most expected to cause the suspect to  spill the beans or caught red handed while handling the deadly explosives!!

After this, we made our way to the platform and I board it when the train arrives. After the porter placed the luggage in the compartment, I went out to hang out with my friends since there was still almost half an hour before the train departed. In the meantime, a policeman with a police dog came over and asked me if one of cartons (containing the speaker) was mine and directed me to come inside the compartment so that he could have a look at it. When inside the compartment, he asked me to take the carton down from the side upper seat where it was kept and asked me what it contained. I told him that it contained speakers. He then asked me to open the package to which I said that I would bring the package down for him to examine it but would not open it since it has been packaged for transportation. Then the policeman commanded his dog “Find” to sniff for suspicious contents and then tapped a little too violently at the side of the speaker with a staff that he was holding in his right hand. I exclaimed that the package contained speakers in them that are breakable and he needn’t have tapped them. He then gave me the advice to stay with my luggage and left.

Maybe people in Mumbai find comfort in seeing a policeman with a sniffer dog jump up and down on trains to hunt down the evil terrorist. I, on the other hand, shudder to think of the consequences that might entail if such unsystematic and incomplete security routines are considered adequate. A security routine that disregards a screening procedure on entry and instead relies on a policeman with a police dog to sniff out suspicious packages randomly long after they have been put away for travel is anything but systematic and complete. I am no security expert, but in my view the cause of security would be best served if the so called security experts at the top of the ladder would have put in place a security procedure that involved appropriate screening procedures using metal detectors, explosive detection/X-ray machines along with a sniffer dog placed right after these two at the entrance itself so as to ensure that no suspicious packages would get through in the first place! A simple screening procedure would perhaps involve the dog sniffing at the packages one after the other while the travelers come in a straight line. I bet my bottom dollar that my suggested security routine would thwart terrorists’ attempts in planting explosives at a higher rate than the current official security checks loosely in place.

The local train users in Mumbai must fear for their lives; better still they should agitate against the powers that may be to put in place tight security procedures.

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One thought on “Protecting India’s non VVIP lives and transportation infrastructure

  1. Pingback: Blood on the train tracks and on successive Railway Ministers’ hands | Endless, Nameless

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